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INDUSTRY 4.0

The Second Industrial Revolution: Part Three of 4IR in Context

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The Second Industrial Revolution: Part Three of 4IR in Context

In a series of articles, we are taking a look back at the industrial revolutions of the past to glean lessons from history as the Fourth Industrial Revolution gathers pace. In this part, the focus is on the Second Revolution, also described as the Technological Revolution.

The breakthroughs in big ideas perhaps lost some pace in the mid nineteenth century, but advances in the 1870s have led historians to place the start of the second revolution here, and it describes a period from 1870 to the start of World War One in 1914. It was in this period, spanning the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th, that ideas around technology and mass production bore fruit, and together brought about a veritable explosion of productivity which quickly transformed the world into the modern industrial age that we all now inhabit. Read more.

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Why Industry 4.0 is Already Failing

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Why Industry 4.0 is Already Failing

For the manufacturing sector, each industrial revolution has been driven by significant advances in technology. Whilst we sit on the cusp of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, known as Industry 4.0, the likes of cyber-physical systems, the Internet of Things and robots have been crowned the future of smart factories. But is anyone able to map out the next industrial revolution with any certainty?

In a series of articles, INSPHERE is examining whether revolutions can indeed be mapped out in advance, and whether history and current state-of-the-art can really guide us to predict what prospects lie around the corner – the trouble with predictions is that they can sometimes be wrong. Read more.

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The Rise of the Scanners

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The Rise of the Scanners

Across all fields of metrology, there has been a marked increase in the use of non-contact measuring systems. While contact probing systems are often regarded as the gold standard in terms of accuracy, non-contact systems offer many advantages. Simple and rapid collection of vast datasets are obviously well suited to measuring complex freeform surfaces but can also be helpful with unknown or variable items, or when geometric tolerances need to be evaluated. Read more.

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